Air Pollution: The EU Gives Carte Blanche to the Steel Industry

Steel producers and the industry in general must comply with new EU emission limits as of 2016. But the steel giants, the second largest industrial polluters in Europe, watered down their obligations through lobbying. Introducing the most suitable technologies to clean up their dirty fumes is just an option, not a requirement. European citizens pay an estimated 60 billion Euro for medical emergencies and premature deaths associated to industrial emissions.

Excess Diesel Car Pollution Kills 5,000 Europeans per Year

Every year, around 5,000 people die prematurely in Europe due to NOx gas emissions from diesel cars that exceed the EU limits. This calculation comes from a new study by an international team of researchers. Excessive pollution is the result of the loopholes in the EU system for vehicles environmental surveillance. The Volkswagen scandal has shown that real road emissions are higher than those declared by manufacturers, far exceeding the legal values.

Brussels Diesel Death Toll Puzzle

Car makers play with our’ life all the time Let’s play with it for a few seconds, just for Fun Click the white space below and make the puzzle. You will find our how many people die prematurely in Brussels as a result of toxic dust generated from diesel cars’ excess emissions provided by flash-gear.com

EU Climate Scam Threatens Citizens Health

Zelzate is one of the villages closed in the industrial port of Gent, home to the second largest laminated steel mill in Europe, owned by Arcelor Mittal. This giant factory is the flame retardant of CO2, as well as fine dust, or particular matter (PM) responsible for health problems among young people. All this is due to a system of “emission falsity” aimed at harnessing the international emissions trading mechanism and maximizing profits

European regulations are easy to bypass

A new independent report reveals how harmful emissions from diesel engines have yet to fall, despite increasingly strict European regulations, and promises from manufacturers to follow the rules. Some manufacturers optimise the more modern vehicles in order to pass the type approval test within a given temperature range (20-30°C) on a predefined test protocol, programming the NOx control systems in such a way that they are deactivated when used in actual driving conditions